Pregnancy Pathway, Outcome – Mom & Baby Health Status

This 2/1/2010 entry seems to draw attention consistently, so we decided it was worth re-posting it. The discussion concerns determinants of the health outcome for mom & baby in the Pregnancy Pathway. It reviews the pathway, and then continues to the last stage of the Pathway, the health outcome. Here’s the whole graphic:

So, the big question is: How can we predict the health outcome of mom and baby, given all the variables of preconception, conception, pregnancy, labor and birth?

Well, there are some things for which we can predict or estimate risk/benefit ratios, and there are some for which we cannot. Let’s start by going over the major things that are not very predictable. At the moment, genetics is pretty much unpredictable. Down the road…maybe…but for now, not so much. Some IVF labs claim they can slightly slightly increase the odds for one sex or the other.

Post-conception, chorionic villi sampling and amniocentesis are methods by which the genetic make-up of the fetus can be identified. These are done mainly to give parents a choice about continuing a pregnancy if there is a question about genetically transmitted disorders or conditions, such as Down Syndrome. But, for now, the best way to manipulate the genetic odds of health outcome for your offspring is to mate with someone who is healthy and has health-prone genes!

Once you are pregnant, it is clear that prenatal health care, exercise, healthy nutrition, stress management and adequate sleep play significant roles in increasing the potential for a healthy outcome for mother AND baby. In fact, not only short term, but also long term healthy outcomes are linked to these factors. These are factors within our control.

Risk factors – most of which are within in our control – that can adversely affect outcomes include environmental toxins, risky behaviors (unsafe sex, drinking, smoking or drugs), poor nutrition, sedentary behavior, stress and isolation (lack of social support). These risks, as well as the benefits, are all discussed in the previous posts.

At this point, it is important to note that there is a lot that goes into making a healthy pregnancy, birth and outcome that is within the control of the mother, providing she has family and/or social support to take good care of herself.

The labor process and birth mode can also affect health outcome, but in general the effect is short-lived. For moms who have received regular care and are in excellent health, the occurrence of a truly devastating birth outcome for mother and/or baby is extremely rare. The exception may be mental or emotional turmoil that can accompany a difficult, unexpected and uncomfortable situation, such as an unplanned cesarean birth.

 

Group exercise programs are a source of social support.

Three interesting research outcomes point to the importance of exercise groups. One is that exercise can help prevent some disorders of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. Second is that the health benefits of exercising during pregnancy and the postpartum period are beneficial for both short and long term for mother and infant. Disorders of pregnancy are risk factors for future cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. Third is that exercise is most likely to occur when there is good social support.

Moving together is a “muscle bonding” experience that helps bind moms-to-be and new moms into a community of support. Within the group, moms can get help with tips for healthy eating and living, along with the support of others who know what she is experiencing. There are a lot of ways to get adequate exercise. When you are pregnant or a new mom, an exercise group can be one critical path to health and well-being.

Preventing Prematurity

Today is a day for bloggers to raise awareness of the growing rate of prematurity in the U.S.  As a pre/postnatal fitness specialist who has been working in the field for more than 30 years, I have a number of thoughts on this topic.

I like to start thinking about this problem by thinking back 50,000 years. Back in the day when survival meant hard physical work. 

Which pregnant women survived?  The strongest, fittest and best fed.

Does it make sense, therefore, that becoming sedentary and eating junk food is going to produce healthy offspring at full term? Well, the evidence says no. This behavior is responsible for some of the growing prematurity. Women who are aerobically fit, eat a healthy diet and maintain a healthy weight generally enjoy these benefits over those who do not:

  • a healthier endometrium into which the zygote will implant
  • a healthier placenta with more nutrient delivery surface
  • reduced risk that the necessary immune system modulations of pregnancy go awry
  • better control of metabolic and cardiovascular factors that can threaten pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes or preeclampsia
  • a greater ability to physically cope with some environmental toxins

There are – of course – factors that affect prematurity in any case. But, to a certain degree, the growing rate of prematurity is another example of lifestyle-caused disorders. Some of the fix therefore requires a lifestyle that is active and health-conscious.

But, I am hopeful. I see – for the first time in a couple of decades – growing numbers of young women interested in living a healthy lifestyle…exercising, eating healthy and seeking to improve environmental conditions. I also see young women interested in preventing poor living conditions and infection rates in this country and in the developing world that have hindered progress in preventing disorders such as gestational diabetes and preeclampsia.

To these young women I say:  kudos. Keep working. We have much work to do.

To young women contemplating pregnancy in their future I say:  become aerobically fit, eat a balanced and colorful diet, spend 15 minutes in the sun most days (or, if you are at risk for skin cancer, take vitamin D), practice meditation or a simple progressive relaxation with deep breathing for 10 or 15 minutes most days.

To all the moms whose babies came too soon, my heart is with you. I know this pain.

Pregnancy Pathway, Outcome – Mom & Baby Health Status

Thank you for your patience while our new website was going up. Also, thanks to those who viewed the site! If you are interested in more research; in taking a class in the U.S. or parts of Europe, South America or South Africa; or, in teaching pre/postnatal fitness, please pop over to the renovated website: www.dancingthrupregnancy. com.

Now, let’s return to our Pregnancy Pathway, take a look where we’ve been, and then continue to the last stage of the Pathway – the health outcome.

Here’s the whole graphic:
So, the big question is:  How can we predict the health outcome of mom and baby, given all the variables of preconception, conception, pregnancy, labor and birth?

Well, there are some things for which we can predict or estimate risk/benefit ratios, and there are some for which we cannot. Let’s start by going over the major things that are not very predictable. At the moment, genetics is pretty much unpredictable. Down the road…maybe…but for now, not so much. Some IVF labs claim they can slightly slightly increase the odds for one sex or the other.

Post-conception, chorionic villi sampling and amniocentesis are methods by which the genetic make-up of the fetus can be identified. These are done mainly to give parents a choice about continuing a pregnancy if there is a question about genetically transmitted disorders or conditions, such as Down Syndrome. But, for now, the best way to manipulate the genetic odds of health outcome for your offspring is to mate with someone who is healthy and has health-prone genes!

Once you are pregnant, it is clear that prenatal health care, exercise, healthy nutrition, stress management and adequate sleep play significant roles in increasing the potential for a healthy outcome for mother AND baby. In fact, not only short term, but also long term healthy outcomes are linked to these factors. These are factors within our control.

Risk factors – most of which are within in our control – that can adversely affect outcomes include environmental toxins, risky behaviors (unsafe sex, drinking, smoking or drugs), poor nutrition, sedentary behavior, stress and isolation (lack of social support). These risks, as well as the benefits, are all discussed in the previous posts.

At this point, it is important to note that there is a lot that goes into making a healthy pregnancy, birth and outcome that is within the control of the mother, providing she has family and/or social support to take good care of herself.

The labor process and birth mode can also affect health outcome, but in general the effect is short-lived. For moms who have received regular care and are in excellent health, the occurrence of a truly devastating birth outcome for mother and/or baby is extremely rare. The exception may be mental or emotional turmoil that can accompany a difficult, unexpected and uncomfortable situation, such as an unplanned cesarean birth.

Pre/postnatal exercise groups provide a community of support

Three interesting research outcomes point to the importance of exercise groups. One is that exercise can help prevent some disorders of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. Second is that the health benefits of exercising during pregnancy and the postpartum period are beneficial for both short and long term for mother and infant. Disorders of pregnancy are risk factors for future cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. Third is that exercise is most likely to occur when there is good social support.

Moving together is a “muscle bonding” experience that helps bind moms-to-be and new moms into a community of support. Within the group, moms can get help with tips for healthy eating and living, along with the support of others who know what she is experiencing. There are a lot of ways to get adequate exercise. When you are pregnant or a new mom, an exercise group can be one critical path to health and well-being.


Pregnancy Pathway, Conception – Review & Small Rant!

REVIEW: Evidence is clear – pre-pregnancy maternal health status, including physical fitness, healthy nutrition and an uncompromised immune system affect the health and well-being of both mother and offspring, in both short and long term.

This is the message summary from our first two areas of discussion:  Preconditions and Conception – the green and sand colored sections on the chart below.

pregnancy_pathway

COMING ATTRACTIONS: We are about to move on to the blue section – Pregnancy!!  So, bookmark this Blog for future reference!

Also, you can subscribe to this Blog by clicking on Blog Info in the upper right corner and then clicking on Subscribe in the drop down menu.

But, yes, you guessed it, first we have a small rant!

SMALL RANT: When we note that fitness, nutrition and a healthy immune system play significant roles in the outcome of pregnancy and the future health of mother and child, we are appealing to young people of childbearing age to be careful about your bodies. The alliance of egg and sperm shapes the world. With 6.5 Billion egg/sperm combinations (yes, people) presently living on earth, our resources are stretched. With time, either we get more picky about doing this, or the 3rd rock from the sun (remember that show?) is cooked.

Humorous incursion: In case you need further enlightenment on this whole area, there is a great website that will help you out. Be prepared to be amused and amazed!

The Truth about Eggs and Sperm

Hopefully, this gets you in the right mood and keeps you smiling. After all, once you actually are pregnant, we have more serious matters to discuss.