DTP Offspring Guest Blog – Ebony Knight & Powerful Pioneers

Doula Ebony Knights became a Dancing Thru Pregnancy teacher in 2014 through the Healthy Start Brooklyn program. Together with her husband, Ebony runs Powerful Pioneers, a program to empower women, seniors and young adults through special workshops, activities and services.

Ebony 8DTP: Tell us about your work as a DTP teacher and a Doula.

EK: We start our class greeting each other, introducing ourselves to newcomers and start off with warm ups, stretching, etc. I have incorporated a Caribbean dance workout, which is a simple dance routine that gave us the opportunity to perform at BMS on stage out doors recently.

Ebony 9Ebony 4After we dance we relax and visualize and end with a discussion (sharing our thoughts and experiences to encourage each other).

To find out more about Ebony’s Doula service, click on this link, then click on the title:
Ebony doula

DTP: What do you most enjoy about your work?

EK: I truly enjoy what I do and was inspired when you traveled so far to teach such an amazing class. Also I have enjoyed getting a chance to meet these lovely ladies; my most committed and dedicated moms have recently had their babies. Some of these moms come back to visit and surprise me. Ebony 6

DTP: Tell us more about Powerful Pioneers and your activities.

EK: My husband and I have an organization called Powerful Pioneers and our mission is to empower women, seniors and children by offering workshops such as vegetarian cooking classes, dance, health education, drama classes and women and youth empowerment workshops.  You are welcome to visit our website to see what we do. If you happen to know any moms or organizations that would like to partner with us or utilize any of our services feel free to share.

Healthy Pregnancy & Birth Essentials – Be Fit! Be Prepared!

Moving relieves stress.

Moving relieves stress.

Do you want a healthy pregnancy, labor, birth and early mothering experience?

This post is designed to provide basic information about achieving this goal. As with any life situation, there are things you can do to help achieve the best outcome of your pregnancy. Some things will be outside your control. Your baby will have blue eyes or brown hair or attached ear lobes depending on genetic factors. But many things are in your control. If you are fit and eat well you will help your baby’s development.

Circumstances can also play a role. For example, where you live can impact how much you walk or whether you are exposed to second-hand smoke. Sometimes you can change these things, but not always. We have put together just the basics, the things you CAN do to help yourself have a healthy pregnancy and birth!

  1. PRENATAL CARE – Repeated studies show that women who have regular health care started early in pregnancy have the best outcomes.
  2. AIR & FOOD – Your muscles need oxygen and blood sugar in order to achieve activities of daily living (ADL), fitness activities, labor, birth, and caring for a newborn. Muscles – including the uterus – need these two essentials in order to this work. Therefore you must do these things:
    • Breathe deeply to strengthen your breathing apparatus.
    • Eat in a way that is balanced (carbs, fats & proteins in every meal or snack) and colorful (fresh fruit & veggies) to train your body to
      Fresh fruit provides vitamins & minerals!!

      Fresh fruit provides vitamins & minerals!!

      produce an even supply of blood sugar and provide needed vitamins & minerals. You need 200 – 300 calories every 2 – 3 hours, depending on your size. Prenatal vitamins are your backup safety mechanism. Eat real food, not edible food-like products (example: potatoes, not potato chips).

    • Drink fluids (primarily water) and eat protein to maintain an adequate blood volume. Blood delivers oxygen and sugar to your muscles, placenta and baby. Pregnancy increases needed blood volume by about 40%. More if you exercise regularly.
    • You don’t need other items, especially things that are dangerous, like alcohol, cigarettes and drugs. Continue safe sex.
  3. PHYSICAL FITNESS – Pregnancy, labor, birth and parenting are ENDURANCE events. Strength, flexibility and mindfulness will help, but only if you have stamina to tolerate the stress to your cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
    Aerobic Dancing improves stamina while having fun!

    Aerobic Dancing improves stamina while having fun!

    • Cardiovascular conditioning or aerobics is the cornerstone of fitness. Make sure to get 20 – 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity 3 or 4 days a week. Find a qualified prenatal aerobic fitness teacher. If you are more than 26 weeks pregnant, start very, very slowly.
    • Core, shoulders, hips, pelvic floor – these areas need adequate strength training and gentle flexibility for range of motion.
    • Relaxation practice has been shown to help reduce the active phase of labor.
    • Mindfulness can be a big help in birth if you have adequate endurance and are not in oxygen debt, out of blood sugar, dehydrated or too tired.
    • Find classes here: DTP Take-a-Class
  4. EDUCATION – Be sure these items are included in your childbirth education course:
    • Landmarks of labor & birth progress
    • Sensations at various points in labor
    • Physical skills that promote labor progress and help achieve a healthy birth

      Learn the benefits "skin-to-skin" after birth.

      Learn the benefits “skin-to-skin” after birth.

    • Pain Management techniques to help you deal with the intensity of birth
    • How to maintain oxygen and sugar supply in labor before going to the hospital and while in the hospital
    • Standard hospital procedures (so you can decide when to go to the hospital)
    • Complications that can lead to medical interventions, including surgery
  5. GET SUPPORT – Make sure you will have continuous support for your labor and birth
    • Spouses, partners, and female family members can be helpful if they accompany you to your Childbirth Education class and know how to help you during the process.
    • A Doula is a great option for support because they are trained to guide a mom and family through the birth process.
  6. POSTPARTUM ACTIVITY WITH BABY – This is a great way to get in shape after birth.
    • Early General Fitness in the first few weeks: walk with the baby in a stroller or carrier, work on kegels and suck in your belly.
    • After 4 – 8 weeks you will be ready to join a Mom-Baby fitness group!
Birth begins the bond or unique love between mother and child.

Birth begins the bond or unique love between mother and child.

Dispelling Myths on Pregnancy Exercise

At regular intervals, it becomes necessary to dispel two persistent myths that are often perpetuated by well-meaning care providers. Both of them were debunked long ago, in research literature that is readily available and about which I have written a great deal, including in my chapters on Women and Exercise (editions 3 & 4) and Health Promotion in Varney’s Midwifery (edition 5), in posts on the DTP website, on my Twitter feed (@anncowlin), on DTP’s Facebook page and in a textbook.

DTP_mover1_pregnantThe more common myth is that pregnant women should never let their pulse get over 140 beats per minute. But, more on that one at another time. That was an ACOG guess in 1985 that long ago (1994) was rescinded.

The other is that pregnant women should never begin a new exercise regimen, but only modify (i.e., reduce) what they are already doing. What brings me to write this blog after a blog break (to respond to our expanding pre/postnatal fitness teacher training program) is that this evening I was told the latter myth was promoted by a CNM at a recent nearby conference. A childbirth education colleague alerted me to this occurrence and also to the happy response by an unknown person in the audience, who chose to differ with the midwife, citing Dancing Thru Pregnancy® as her example!! Thank you to this responder.

Let me address – yet again – the issue of whether it is safe for pregnant women to begin an exercise regimen after they become pregnant. The caveat I offer at the outset is that doing so should be under the supervision of a knowledgeable certified pre/postnatal fitness specialist. Within the profession, the resolution of this question is generally agreed to be the Cochrane Review conducted in 2002, which found that aerobic fitness can be improved or maintained in pregnancy. Improvement requires increasing the level of aerobic challenge. More recently, researchers concluded “….pregnant women benefit from regular physical activity the same way as non pregnant subjects…” and that “…[t]he adoption or continuation of a sedentary lifestyle during pregnancy may contribute to the development of certain disorders such as hypertension, maternal and childhood obesity, gestational diabetes, dyspnoea, and pre-eclampsia.” (Melzer et al. Physical activity and pregnancy: cardiovascular adaptations, recommendations and pregnancy outcomes. Sports Med. 2010 Jun 1;40(6):493-507. 

Put another way, the female is not put together to be sedentary in pregnancy. It is only in recent decades that this is an option. Until the mid 20th Century, activities of daily living required physical fitness, and obesity was rare, along with sedentary behavior. In the last few decades, those who are knowledgeable about the interactions of pregnancy and exercise, and who have the experience of teaching movement to this population, have come to understand how to present activities that improve the factors that improve maternal and fetal outcomes.

Those who are extremely well-versed in the field all agree that cardiovascular (aerobic) fitness during the 6 – 12 month pre-pregnancy period may be the greatest pregnancy enhancement a woman can have. Why? Because endothelial function is greatly enhanced, oxidative stress is reduced, and vascularity is increased by aerobic fitness, and these capacities underly healthy implantation and placental development (see Research Updates 2001-2005, Winter 2005 and Winter 2004 and Update on Immune Function). Barring that, beginning early in pregnancy is helpful because placental development is still underway. Barring that, mild to moderate aerobic activity introduced by 25-30 weeks will produce cardiovascular enhancement by the time of labor. My caveat goes here, too.

All conditions mediated by inflammation are a problem in pregnancy. Physical fitness is a major preventive strategy for inflammation, and pregnancy does not stand in the way.

 

 

Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

I was recently asked some questions regarding blood pressure during pregnancy by my colleagues at Physiquality. In preparing material, I wrote this blog, which includes very basic clinical information and explanations about this topic.

What is the normal range for blood pressure for pregnant women? What readings would fall under high blood pressure?

Blood Pressure (BP) in pregnancy is a complex topic.

First, we need to know: What are the classifications of BP?

The chart below is from the evidence-based 2014 Guidelines of the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute of the NIH. The first number is Systolic BP or during the heart beat. The second number is Diastolic BP or between beats. These numbers are relevant for women of childbearing age.

  • Normal                        <120 mm Hg and <80 mm Hg
  • Pre-hypertensive          120-139 or 80-89
  • High BP Stage 1            140-159 or 90-95
  • High BP Stage 2            ≥ 160 or ≥ 10

Why does low BP (hypotension) occur in a healthy pregnancy?

A healthy pregnant woman with normal BP and no cardiovascular or immune system complications, will have pregnancy BP lower than her non-pregnant BP due to increased progesterone relaxing her vasculature. To create the placental and uterine blood flow, blood volume (V) expands rapidly increasing by around 40%, but stroke volume increases less, so beats per minute (pulse) may increase, systolic BP may drop 5 mm Hg and diastolic may drop 10-15 mm Hg. If V is not adequate with this relaxed vasculature, BP may drop even lower. To help maintain normal BP, women are encouraged to drink sufficient water (about 8 glasses/day) and eat enough protein (about 20-25% of daily intake) to produce a blood volume that will sustain an adequate BP. Other more severe conditions – often genetic – may also be relevant, such as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

Other causes of hypotension include lying still on the back with legs extended for long periods of time after the first trimester. The weight of the uterus impinges on the vena cava returning blood to the heart, thus reducing BP and blood flow to the uterus and placenta. Also, standing for long periods of time with a minimum of motion, as happens with teachers, cashiers, line workers and nurses in the second half of pregnancy when increasing relaxin and elastin cause further softening of vasculature. This results in difficulty returning blood from the lower limbs and reducing blood flow to the uterus and placenta.

What are hypertensive disorders of pregnancy?

According to the National High Blood Pressure Education Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are presently classified into four categories:

  • Chronic hypertension (pre-existing)
  • Preeclampsia-eclampsia
  • Preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension
  • Gestational hypertension

[The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada categorize these disorders as pre-existing or gestational, with the addition of preeclampsia to either category.]

Chronic hypertension is BP >140/90 prior to pregnancy or before 20 weeks. New onset of high BP after 20 weeks may indicate preeclampsia (PE), which requires further consideration. PE involves other symptoms and organs. It occurs in about 5% of all pregnancies, 10% of first pregnancies and 20-25% of women with a history of chronic hypertension. It is a serious disorder and major cause of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including strokes, seizures and restricted fetal growth and development.

The underlying pathogenesis of preeclampsia-ecclampsia is not yet fully understood, but is a fundamental dysfunction of the placenta leading to endothelial dysfunction and vasospasm. Possible causes include pre-existing endothelial dysfunction, metabolic dysfunction, auto-immune responses and infection. It is likely that the placenta is affected very early on, during implantation, trophoblast invasion of the uterus and opening of the spiral arteries to form the blood pool on the maternal side of the placental circulation.

Gestational hypertension is the onset of BP >140/90 after 20 weeks without other features of preeclampsia. About 1/3 of these women develop preeclampsia. Gestational hypertension is highly associated with hypertensive disorders later in life. Diabetes can also be a factor associated with hypertension.

Whenever a woman has elevated BP in pregnancy, she needs to be evaluated and have a follow up course of observation and treatment. At its most severe, a hypertensive disorder can affect all the body’s organs and systems, and can be fatal.

What can pregnant women do (diet, exercise, healthy habits) to keep their blood pressure within a normal range?

Some risk factors for hypotension or hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are inherited, others are a consequence of behavior, and many are a combination.

What can a woman do before pregnancy?

Because the events that pre-dispose a woman to hypertensive disorders may occur before she knows she is pregnant, some efforts at prevention may be helpful in the six months to a year prior to pregnancy. Preparing for the implantation period by maintaining optimal health and fitness is likely the most helpful behavior. Cardiovascular or aerobic fitness, which prevents or reduces the severity of endothelial dysfunction is highly valuable. An adequate daily nutrient intake along with sufficient water, and maintaining a BMI <25 are important factors. Women with elevated blood pressure should discuss with their care provider the balance of sodium and potassium intake, along with the total allowable amounts.

Avoiding infections or illness around the time of conception may be a factor. Hypertensive disorders are mediated by inflammation. Unfortunately, another factor may be the maternal immune response to the fetal DNA. This may also be dependent on combined maternal/paternal immune system responses.

What can a woman do once she is pregnant?

Once a woman is pregnant, maintaining optimal health and fitness continue to be important. Even if there are pre-disposing factors for disorders, she may be able to reduce the severity by staying fit, well nourished and well rested. A balanced and colorful diet, along with avoidance of alcohol, drugs and unsafe behaviors are critical.

The ability to achieve the Relaxation Response, meditation, deep breathing and hypnosis are valuable for acute BP reduction. Each of these skills is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system response (or alpha brain rhythm) and mitigates the effects of stress on a temporary basis. Cardiovascular or aerobic fitness is effective for long-term BP reduction, as well as cardiovascular health.

Resting on the left side maximizes circulation and – if possible – finding 15 or 20 minutes to rest this way during the day is beneficial, especially if a woman’s work involves standing for long periods of time. Avoiding lying on the back or standing for long periods of time is advisable. Finding a community of support for having a healthy pregnancy can be a great asset, as well.

CleanBirth – Saving Lives for $5

As part of our mission to contribute to safe motherhood around the globe, DTP is promoting the work of CleanBirth.org. This organization works to make birth safer in southern Laos, which has the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality in the region[1]. CB1 Mum baby red hat The vast majority of women give birth without a trained attendant or clean supplies, but CleanBirth.org is making a difference, improving outcomes through simple initiatives that provide life-saving birthing supplies and information.

To promote hygienic birth, CleanBirth.org partners with a Lao non-profit, Our Village Association (OVA) to train local nurses to distribute Clean Birth Kits – the life saving birth supplies that cost a mere $5 each. The nurses then train a volunteer from each village to distribute and track the kits and spread information about safe birthing practices.

CB2 KitClean Birth Kits have been shown to prevent infection – a major birth-related killer – and village health volunteers have been shown to reduce neonatal and maternal deaths[2-5]. Along with providing these kits, CleanBirth.org is involved with the education for nurses and Village volunteers. Because they are part of the local culture, they are respected and can provide the kits, explain how to use them and give information on how to be safe during pregnancy and birth.

More kits and more training are needed. A nurse in the Tahoy District trained a local midwife who noted that using the kit is convenient and easy and keeps the mother and baby clean. CB3 Tahoy volunteer

During 2013, CleanBirth.org supplied 2,000 birth kits and trained 16 local nurses and 20 Village volunteers. To keep up this momentum, CleanBirth.org has formed an alliance with the Yale University School of Nursing to improve the training. Right now, you can help! CleanBirth.org is currently fundraising via startsomegood.com/cleanbirth to fund training for 15 nurses and 20 volunteers by Yale midwives during July 2014, as well as providing 500 Clean Birth Kits.

If you can, please donate to this mission:

  • $5 provides a life-saving Clean Birth Kit
  • $100 trains a Village volunteer
  • $250 sponsors a nurse who serves as many as 1o villages

Think of this as your Valentine present to the world. Safe Motherhood is a major global movement, and organizations such as CleanBirth.org are the on-the-ground work force that is bringing about improvements in maternal and newborn survival.

Thank you!!

1. “At a glance: Lao People’s Democratic Republic.” Accessed 29July 2013. http://unicef.org/infobycountry/laopdr_statistics.html

2. Brierly, C. “Clean delivery kits linked to substantial reduction in neonatal death is South Asia, study shows,” Wellcome Trust (2012). Accessed 8 August 2013. http://wellcome.ac.uk/News/Media-office/Press-releases/2012/WTVM054518.htm

3. “Clean Birth Kits – Potential to Deliver.” Accessed 8 August 2013. http://healthynewbornnetwork.org/sites/default/files/resources/CBK_brief-LOW-RES.pdf

4. Gogia S and Sachdev H. “Home visits by community health workers to prevent neonatal deaths in developing countries: a systematic review.” Accessed 5 August 2013. http://who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/9/09-069369/en/

5. Wilson A et al. “effectiveness of strategies incorporating taining and support of traditional birth attendants on perinatal and maternal mortality: meta-analysis.” BMJ 2011 Dec. Accessed 13 August 2013. http://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22134967